The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons, Patient Education Site

Primary hyperaldosteronism (Conn's syndrome or aldosterone-producing adrenal tumor)

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Signs and Symptoms

Primary Hyperaldosteronism
Signs:
High blood pressure
Low blood potassium
Low blood acid
Symptoms:
Headache
Vision problems
Fatigue
Muscle cramps
Muscle weakness
Numbness
Temporary paralysis
Increased urine
Increased thirst
Figure 2: Signs and Symptoms of Primary Hyperaldosteronism

The most common sign of primary hyperaldosteronismPrimary hyperaldosteronism - a disease where too much aldosterone is being made is high blood pressure (hypertension) that does not respond to standard blood pressure medications. Patients with hypertension, especially resistant hypertension (i.e. blood pressure that is difficult to control and that requires multiple medications) should be tested for primary hyperaldosteronism. A low level of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia) is another sign, although patients with normal potassium levels may still have primary hyperaldosteronism. Low acidity of the blood (metabolic alkalosis) also is common. The symptoms of primary hyperaldosteronism are caused by the hypertension and hypokalemia. High blood pressure may cause headache or blurred vision. Low potassium may cause fatigue, muscle cramps, muscle weakness, numbness, or temporary paralysis.





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